new
archives
faq
links
contact
ISSUE NO. 853
X
X
X



Former Marvel Comics production manager Sol Brodsky left Marvel to found his own comic book company. Partnering with entreprenaur Israel Waldman, to form Skywald Comics -- a name arrived at by combining its founders names.

Skywald tried to compete with Warren by publishing black and white horro magazines, but where Warren acheived an extremly high level of quality, Skywald's "horror-mood" magazines were an all-out schlock festival. We covered the carnage starting in Dial B #773.

Skywalds's color comics were similairly low-grade, although Brodsky did manage to get a few superstars to work on its books, such as Steve Ditko, Dick Giordano, and Gaspar Saladino, but sadly, the company's westerns were done by several less popular, B-list creators to do some new lead features, but the back-up stories consisted of ancient reprints from long-defunct publishers.

The company struggled from its inception, and ultimately, it failed, with none of its titles lasting more than three issues. In this issue of Dial B, we're going to take a look at the company's western comics: Butch Cassidy, The Sundance Kid, Blazing Six-Guns, Wild Western Action, and The Bravados.

Although these books shared names with enormously popular movies, they had absolutely nothing to do with the films. Skywald, a new company with tight budgets, simply took advantage of the fact that these were real, historical people whose names and liknesses were firmly located in the public domain, making them available to anyone, to use for free.

Brodsky quit the company in 1972, and returned to Marvel. Skywald went out of business in 1975.

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

 
X

X
X

X